Change Management Resources

Change Management Training


Change Management Definitions

  • Request for Change (RFC): A means of proposing a change to any component of an IT Infrastructure or any aspect of an IT service. It may be a document or record in which the nature and details of and the justification and authorization for the proposed change are entered.
  • Post Implementation Review (PIR): A PIR is an assessment and review of the completed working solution.
  • Change Advisory Board (CAB): The CAB is a group of individuals comprised of representatives from all major IT sections and the related business community. These members are the people who can best make decisions about changes and the change schedule because of their understanding of the business goals, as well as the technical and operational risks.
  • Production: University staff, faculty, students and other users depend on the service to complete business and academic tasks and objectives.
  • Pre Approved Change (PAC): A preapproved change is an ongoing routine change that doesn't impact customers, affect services, or cause an outage.

Change Management FAQs

Q. What is Change Management?
A. The objective of Change Management is to ensure that standard methods and procedures are used, such that change can be dealt with quickly, with the lowest possible impact on service quality.

Q. Why is Change Management important?
A. Change Management is required for two primary reasons: compliance for systems subject to PCI, HIPAA, SAS112 and other data restrictions; and increased operational stability.

Q. What is a Change?
A. A change is any modification that could have a potential impact on clients and/or significant impact on the stability and reliability of the production ITS environment

Q. How do I incorporate Change Management into my daily operations?
A.  Follow the ITS Outage Process for all planned and unplanned outages or changes that may have a risk to the stability of the system. Contact Marian Sherrin for details about incorporating the full Change Management process into your daily operations. 

Q. What is the definition of "production" environment?
A. The production environment is the normal operating environment. Processes and tasks associated with this environment are integral and critical to the organization's productivity and operational stability.

Q. What is an RFC?
A. An RFC is a Request For Change. An RFC is submitted for approval to Change Management. Depending on the change scope, risk, impact and urgency, it is routed to the appropriate Change Advisory Board (CAB) for review. RFCs are reviewed for readiness of the change, not the technical or business merits of the change. Readiness includes implementation steps, testing results, backout plans, training plans and communication plans.

Q. What's a Pre-Approved Change (PAC)?
A. A pre-approved change (PAC) is a low risk or impact change that does not require approval prior to implementation. There are many daily operational changes that could be classified as PACs. In order for a change to be considered a PAC, the change must go through and be reviewed first as a normal change with full detailed documentation on how the change is done in a repeatable and standard way. The CAB can grant PAC status if the documentation indicates that the risk is low and the change is completely documented.

Q. What is the Change Advisory Board or CAB?
A. The Change Advisory Board (CAB) is a group of individuals comprised of representatives from all major IT sections and the related business community. The Change Manager chairs this group. Its members are the people who can best make decisions about changes and the change schedule because of their understanding of the business goals, as well as the technical and operational risks.

The objective of a CAB is to act as an authoritative group ensuring that changes with are prioritized and planned accordingly, with the lowest possible impact to the campus and on service quality. A CAB meets regularly to assess, prioritize, and plan changes.  It is not the charge of the CAB to evaluate the strategic or qualitative aspects of changes.

Q. What's a PIR?
A. A Post Implementation Review (PIR) is akin to a post-mortem. After every change, a PIR should be done to report status of the change. For example, some questions are: Was the change successful? Was backout required? Were any new incidents or problems created as a result of this change? Any aspects of the change that could be improved next time? Any lessons learned?